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This tumblr is for anyone who is interested in, or practices, the darker aspects of the Craft, or the oft misunderstood rites of Santería, Voodoo, Asatrú, and everything in between. We discuss the maligned deities, the disparaged paths, and most of all, balancing the dark with the light. For how do we know when the sun sets if the moon doth not rise?

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Demonology: Demons AA-AL
  • Aariel: A demon granted the title of duke. Aariel serves in the court of the infernal king Asyriel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Aariel manifests only during the hours of the day. He is connected with the direction of the south and has twenty ministering spirits to serve him. See also ARTS THEURGIA, ASYRIEL.
  • Abaddon: In the Book of Job and Proverbs, Abaddon is mentioned as a place of destruction, possibly equivalent in concept with the modern notion of Hell. However, in Revelation 9:11, Abaddon is no longer the Abyss itself but is instead personified as the angel in charge of that Abyss. The name is translated in Greek to Apollyon, meaning “The Destroyer.” Both Abaddon and Apollyon were integrated into demonology as powerful princes of Hell. In Francis Barret’s The Magus, Abaddon is associated with the seventh mansion of the furies, and he is said to govern destruction and wasting. Gustav Davidson, in his classic Dictionary of Angels, describes ABaddon as the “angel of the Abyss.” In Crowley’s edition of the Goetia, Abaddon is again mentioned, not as a being, but as a place mentioned in a binding. See also APPOLYON, GOETIA.
  • Abadir: Mathers suggests that the name of this demon means “scattered.” Abadir appears in his 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, where he is said to serve the infernal lord Asmodeus. The name is also spelledAbachir. See also: ASMODEUS, MATHERS.
  • Abael: One of several demons who serce in the court of Dorochiel. Abael holds the rank of chief duke with four hundred lesser spirits at his command. According to the Ars Theurgia, he servesin the second half of the night, between midnight and dawn. See also ARS THEURGIA, DOROCHIEL.
  • Abahin: In the 1898 Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, the name of this demon appears in a list of ingernal servants to the arch-fiends Astaroth and Asmodeus. Mathers suggests that the name of this demon means “the Terrible One,” from a root word in Hebrew. In another version of theAbramelin material, originally written in code and currently kept at the Wolfenbüttal library (the Herzog August Bibilothek,) in Wolfenbüttal, Germany, the name of this demon is spelled Ahabhon. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Abalam: According to Wierus’s Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, if the demon Paimon is summoned and given a sacrifice or other offering, this demon, along with his companion Beball, will also appear. Both Abalam and Beball are demonic kings who serve the Goetic demon Paimon. In the Goetia, their names appear asLabal and Abali. See also BEBALL, PAIMON, WIERUS.
  • Abariel: A demon in the hierarchy of the infernal prince Usiel. The Ars Theurgia describes Abariel as a chief duke who belongs to the hours of daylight. He has forty ministering spirits beneath him. Abariel has the power to conceal hidden treasure so that it may not be discovered or stolen. He can also reveal things that have been hidden, especially those items obscurred through magick or enchantments. See also ARS THEURGIA, USIEL.
  • Abas: In the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Abas is listed as a demon of lies and trickery. He can be called upon to assist the magician in matters dealing with illusion as well as spells of invisibility. This demon also appears in the Mathers translation of the Clavicula Salomonis with the same associations. According to Driscoll’s editions of the Sworn Book, Abas is the king of the regions below the earth. His province includes the riches of the earth, and he is said to be able to locate and provide all manner of costly metals, including silver and gold. Additionally, he seems to be able to cause earthquakes, for it is said that he can pull down buildings and other structures and cause them to be destroyed. Finally, Abas and his minions can teach knowledge of the mixture of the elements, a possible reference to alchemy, although alchemical workings are not specifically described within the test. In the Clavicula Salomonis, the name of this demon is spelled Abac. See also CLAVICULA SALOMONIS, MATHERS, SWORN BOOK
  • Abbnthada: Described as an agreeable, if somewhat jealous demon, Abbnthada appears in the hierarchy of Harthan, an infernal king who rules the element of water. According to the Driscoll edition of the Sworn Book, Abbnthada can be enticed to appear with the air of appropriate perfumes. When he manifests, his body is large and has a mottled complexion. He has the power to swiftly move things from place to place, and he can provide darkness when it is required of him. He can also bestow strength in resolution, helping others to avenge wrongs. See also HARTHAN, SWORN BOOK.
  • Abdalaa: According to the Liber de Angelis, Abdalaa holds the rank of king in the hierarchy of Hell. He appears in connection with a compulsion spell guaranteed to procure the love of a woman. From the profusion of such spells in all of the magickal texts, it would seem that practitioners of the black arts had a very difficult time finding a date in the Middle Ages. To cure the medieval magician’s lonely heart, this demon, along with his minions, were to be invoked and set upon the desired woman, at which point they would torment her horribly until she accepted her newfound mate. Note that Abdalaa is suspiciously close to the Arabic name Abdullah. This name means “servant of God” and is not generally associated with demons. See also LIBER DE ANGELIS.
  • Abelaios: A demon who aids in spells of invisibility, Abelaios appears in Mathers’ translation of the Clavicula Salomonis. He is said to answer to the demon Almiras, master of invisibility, and to Almiras’ infernal minister, Cheros. This demon also appears in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also ALMIRAS, CHEROS, CLAVICULA SALOMONIS, MATHERS.
  • Abezithibod: A demon who allegedly inhabits the Red Sea. Abezithibod appears to King Solomon in the extra-biblical Testament of Solomon. In this text, the demon claims to have actively worked against Moses during the parting of the Red Sea. He was trapped underwater after the parted sea came crashing back together again. Solomon puts the braggart demon to work, commanding him to uphold a massive pillar that must remain suspended in the air until the world’s end. In his dealings with King Solomon, Abezithibod reveals himself as a rather prideful fellow, demanding special respect from the biblical monarch because he is the spawn of an archangel. He claims that his father is Beelzebub. THe notion that some demonic beings are actually the offspring of angels ties back to the tradition of the Watcher Angels mentioned in the Book of Enoch. See also BEELZEBUB, SOLOMON, WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Abgoth: In the fifteenth-century magickal text known as the Munich Handbook, this demon is summoned to assist with spells concerning the art of scrying. He is also called upon to discover the persons responsible for theft, so that justice may be done. He appears by name in the fortieth spell in the Munich Handbook. The same test includes the name Abgo, which, although presented as a separate demon, may well be a misspelling of this demon’s name. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Aboc: In the Ars Theurgia, Aboc is a demon who holds the rank of duke. He serves in the hierarchy of the north, and his immediate superior is the infernal king Baruchas. Aboc commands thousands of lesser spirits. He will only manifest in the hours and minutes that fall in the fifth section of the day, when the day is divided into fifteen portions of time. See also ARS THEURGIA, BARUCHAS.
  • Abracas: Listed as a demon in Collin de Plancy’s 1863 edition of the Dictionnaire Infernal, Abracas is none other than Abraxas, a Gnostic deity who appears in the writings of Simon Magus. According to de Plancy, the demon’s name derives fromabracadabra, a word used widely in magickal talismans. This derivation, however, is highly suspect. Abraxas is often depicted as a composite being. He has a man’s body, often armored, with legs like serpents and the head of a cock. He carries a whip in one hand and a shield in the other. His appearance is similar to that of a charioteer, and indeed, in some depictions, he appears riding a chariot pulled by full horses. The horses themselves represent the four elements. In Gnostic mythology, Abraxas is generally said to have a serpentine body surmounted by the head of a lion. The leonine head is surrounded with rays like those of the sun, an image that may hearken back to a Persian sun god, said to share the same name. The rooster-headed image, however, remains the most recognizable, as it was commonly depicted on amulets, known as Abraxas stones, in the second century CE and thereafter. See also DE PLANCY.
  • Abriel: A demon serving in the hierarchy of the infernal prince Dorochiel, Abriel’s name appears in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to command four hundred subordinate spirits. He holds the rank of chief duke and manifests only in the hours between noon and dusk. Through Dorochiel, he is affiliated with the west. See also ARS THEURGIA, DOROCHIEL.
  • Abrulges: One of several demonds named in association with Pamersiel, the first and chief spirit under Carnesiel, the infernal Emperor of the East. Abrulges holds the rank of duke, and he is reputed to possess a particularly nasty temperament. According to the Ars Theurgia, he is both arrogant and decietful and he should never be trusted with secret matters. Despite this, howeve, his naturally aggressive nature can sometimes be turned towards good. Abrulges and all his fellow dukes can be used to drive off other spirits of darkness, especially those that haunt houses. See also ARS THEURGIA, CARNESIEL, PAMERSIEL.
  • Abuchaba: A demon tied to the west wind. Abuchaba functions as a servant of Harthan, the king of the spirits of the moon. His name appears in the Peterson translation of the Sworn Book of Honorious. According to this book, he has the power to change thoughts and wills. He can also call rains. The angels Gabriel, Michael, Samyhel, and Atithael all have power over him. See also HARTHAN,SWORN BOOK.
  • Abutes: According to Mathers’ translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, this demon’s name means “bottomless” or “measureless.” Abutes appears in a list of demonic servitors who answer to the arch-demons Asmodeus and Astaroth. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Acham: A demon named in the Peterson edition of the Grimorium Verum.According to this text, Acham is a demon who presides over Thursday. He is also associated with Thursdays in the Grimoire of Pope Honorius.
  • Achol: A demon goverened by the infernal king Symiel. Achol has sixty lesser spirits that minister to him. According to the Ars Theurgia, he is est summoned by day in a remote location or a private room of the house. Through his association with Symiel, Achol is connected with the direction north. See also ARS THEURGIA, SYMIEL.
  • Acquiot: In the Grimoire of Pope Honorius, this is the demon ruling Sunday. Acquiot may well be invented, as the Grimoire of Pope Honorius was a spurious grimoire intended to cash in on the reputation of the fourteenth-century Sworn Book of Honorius. See also SWORN BOOK.
  • Acreba: One of twenty dukes said to serve the demon Barmiel. According to theArs Theurgia, Barmiel is the first an chief spirit of the south. Acreba serves his infernal master during the hours of the night and oversees the command of twenty ministering spirits of his own. See also ARS THEURGIA, BARMIEL.
  • Acteras: A duke of the demon Barmiel named in the Ars Theurgia. Acteras serves his infernal king during the hours of the day. He commands twenty lesser spirits and, through his affiliation with Barmiel, is connected with the south. See alsoARS THEURGIA, BARMIEL.
  • Acuar: According to Mathers in his translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, this demon’s name is related to a Hebrew word meaning “tiller of the earth.” Acuar is one of several demons who serve the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions: Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Adan: In the Ars Theurgia, Adan is a demon who serves in the court of the infernal prince Usiel. He is a revealer of secrets, and he also has the power to hide treasure so as to protect it from thieves. He serves only during the hours of the night, and he will only manifest during this time. He has forty lesser spirits that carry out his commands at all times. See also ARS THEURGIA, USIEL.
  • Adirael: In his 1898 translation of the Sacred magic of Abramelin the Mage, occultist S. L. Mathers presents this name as meaning “magnificence of God.” Although this sounds like the name of an angel, Adirael is almost certainly fallen. According to the Abramelin material, Adirael is a servant of Beelzebub. See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Admirable HistoryA book published in 1613 by Sebastien Mchaelis recounting his exorcisms of a nun. According to Michaelis, during the process of this exorcism, the demon Berith explained to him the hierarchy of Hell. Berith also revealed the sins that were the special province of each demon as well as the holy adversary of that demon. The adversary of the demon was typically a saint who had suffered the temptation of the demon’s sin but did not fall. This armor of faith then gave the saint power to overcome the demon of that particular sin. See also BERITH.
  • Adon: A demon named in Mathers’ translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Adon’s name is almost certainly derived from Adonai, one of several Hebrew names for God. As a demon, Adon serves beneath Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon, the demonic princes of the four directions. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON
  • Adramelek: One of many demons named in Collin de Plancy’s extensiveDictionnaire Infernal, published and republished throughout the nineteenth century. The name of this demon is actually the same of a Samaritan sun god whose name was also sometimes rendered Adramelech. As such, he is one of the many foreign deities mentioned in the Old Testament that have been demonized with the passage of time. The early-nineteenth century French Writer, Charles Berbiguier, describes Adramelek as the Lord High Chancellor of Hell. In his book Les Farfadets, Berbiguier further asserts that Adramelek has ben awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of the Fly, a supposedly demonic knightly order founded by Beelzebub. A.E. Waite, writing in his classic Book of Black Magic, repeats Berbiguier’s attributions, although he incorrectly links them to the sixteenth-century scholar Johannes Wierus. Agrippa identifies him as an ancient king demonized over time. See also AGRIPPA, BEELZEBUB, BERBIGUIER, DE PLANCY, WAITE, WIERUS.
  • Afarop: A demon whose name appears in Mathers’ edition of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Afarorp is a servitor of the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions: Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Afray: S. L. Mathers gives the meaning of this demon’s name as “dust” in his 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. According to this work, Afray serves the greater demons Asmodeus and Astaroth. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Agaliarept: This demon appears in the Grand Grimoire and is named as a general of Hell. He is purported to command the Second Legion of Spirits for the glory of the emperor Lucifer and his Prime Minister, Lucifuge Rofocale. Agaliarept is a keeper of mysteries, and he is credited with the power to reveal any arcane or sublime secrets to the dutiful practitioner. Buer, Guison, and Botis, three beings traditionally included among the seventy-two demons of the Goetia, supposedly answer directly to him. See also BOTIS, BUER, GUISON, LUCIFER, LUCIFUGE, ROFOCALE
  • Agapiel: One of fifteen demons who serve Icosiel, a wandering prince of the air. Agapiel holds the title of duke and oversees another two thousand two hundred ministering spirits. He is said to apear only during the hours and minutes that fall int o the fifth portion of time, when the day is divided into fifteen equal parts. In the Ars Theurgia, Agapiel and his cohorts are said to have a fondness for houses and are most likely to be found in private homes. See also ARS THEURGIA, ICOSIEL.
  • Agares: Names as the First Duke under the power of the east, Agares oversees a total of thirty-one legions of infernal spirits. According to Wierus’sPseudomonarchia Daemonum, he is very willing to appear when summoned. He takes the form of an old man riding a crocodile and carries a hawk on his fist. He has power over runaways and can fetch them back at the behest of the summoner. He can also compel people to run. He teaches languages and confers both supernatural and temporal dignities. He also has the power to cause earthquakes. He belongs to the Order of Virtues. According to the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is constrained by the angel Jeliel. See also GOETIA, RUDD, WIERUS.
  • Agasaly: One of several demons said to serve Paimon, one of the infernal princes of the cardinal directions. Agasaly is named in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the 1898 Mathers translation of this work, drawn from a flawed French manuscript written in the fifteenth-century, this name is spelled Agafali. See also MATHERS, PAIMON.
  • Agateraptor: In Peterson’s translation of the Grimorium Verum, Agateraptor is listed as one of three demons who work as chiefs of Belzebuth, a variation on the name Beelzebub. In the True Keys of Solomon, this demon appears under the spelling Agatraptor. Along with his cohorts, Himacth and Stephanate, he is also said to serve the demon Beelzebub. See also bEELZEBUB, GRIMORIUM VERUM, HIMACTH, STEPHANATE, TRUE KEYS.
  • Agchoniôn: A demon of crib death mentioned in the Testament of Solomon. Agchoniôn appears with the head of a beast and the body of a man. In addition to suffocating infants in their cribs, he is said to lie in wait for men near cliffs. When a likely victim comes along, Achoniôn creeps up behind him and pushes him to his death. This demon of suffering is number thirty-tree from among the thirty-six demons associated with the decans of the zodiac. He can be driven away through the use of the name Lycurgos. See also SOLOMON.
  • Agei: A demon whose name appears in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Agei appears in the court of the demons Astaroth and Asmodeus, and he serves both of these infernal masters. According to another version of the Abramelin material kept at the Wolfenbüttal library in Germany, the name of this demon should be spelled Hageyr. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Agibol: A servitor of the demon-kings Amaimon and Ariton, Agibol appears in the 1898 Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Mathers suggests that this demon’s name may stem from a Hebrew term meaning “forcible love,” but that reading is tentative at best. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS.
  • Aglafys: A demon said to serve Paimon, one of the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions. Aglafys appears in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Notably, AGLA is a word that commonly appears on amulets associated with the grimoiric tradition. It is also used in the invocation of spirits, typically occuring alongside “secret” names of God, such as Shaddai and Sabaoth. In the Mathers edition of the Abramelin material, the name of this demon is given as Aglafos. See also MATHERS, PAIMON.
  • Aglas: Appears in the Ars Theurgia in connection with the court of the demon Gediel. Here, he is ranked as a duke who serves his infernal master by night. He commands a total of twenty lesser spirits. The name of this demon is probably derived from the magickal word AGLA. See also ARS THEURGIA, GEDIEL.
  • Aglasis: Appearing in the Grimorium Verum, this demon will destroy the enemies of the magician upon command. He also has power over travel and can instantly transport the magician to a location of his choosing. His name is likely another variation on the magickal word AGLA.
  • Agor: A chief due serving beneath the demon Malgaras. Agor is tied to the powers of the day and has thirty lesser spirits to serve him. His name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia, a seventeenth-century text that details an array of demons connected with the points of the compass. Through Malgaras, he is associated with the west. See also ARS THEURGIA, MALGARAS.
  • Agra: One of eight infernal dukes said to serve the demon-king Gediel during the hours of the night. Through his service to Gediel, Agra is associated with the southern point of the compass. According to the Ars Theurgia, he holds the rank of duke. Twenty lesser spirits exist to carry out his desires. See also ARS THEURGIA, GEDIEL.
  • Agrax: A demon serving beneath both Astaroth and Asmoedus, according to the 1898 Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In other versions of the Abramelin material, the name of this demon is spelled Argax. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Agrippa, Henry Cornelius: A Renaissance writer best known for his three-volume work de occulta philosophia, known widely as the Three Books of Occult Philosophy. Agrippa lived from 1486 until 1535 and studied briefly under the German abbot and ocultist Trithemius. When his Occult Philosophy was first produced around 1510, he sent the manuscript to Trithemius to get his old teacher’s opinions. Trithemius cautioned Agrippa to be secretive about his work because of its contents, and this may have inspired Agrippa to hold back on any formal publication of the book for nearly twenty years. Nevertheless, the work circulated widely in manuscript form, gaining a widespread reputation. The Three Books of Occult Philosophy was Agrippa’s attempt to revivify the art of magick as it had been practiced in the ancient world. He covers a wide range of topics, from natural magick to astrology, divination, and even necromancy. He draws upon a wide variety of sources, from the words of Greek and Roman philosophers to material drawn from Jewish mysticism and grimoires like the Heptameron. His book is probably one of the most influential works on Western occultism and esoterica. It is referred to again and again in the writings of Dr. John Dee, and many subsequent works, including a number of grimoires, integrate whole passes from the Occult Philosophy. Sometimes Agrippa is acknowledged as the author of this material and sometimes he is plagiarized with gusto. One such instance involves The Magus: or the Celestial Intelligence, produced by Francis Barrett in 1801. Barrett freely makes use of Agrippas material without much mention of Agrippa himself. In a similar vein of capitalizing on Agrippa’s work without his input, a Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy was produced thirty years after Agrippa’s death. It is nevertheless attributed to Agrippa and pretends to include all of the demonic material and ceremonies originally cut from his work in order to appease its critics. Johannes Wierus, the famed student of Agrippa, categorically denounces this work as a forgery in his own book De Praestigiis Daemonum. Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy was finally produced in a printed form in 1533. Its denouncement by Dominican Inquisitor Conrad Köllin of Ulm as a work of heresy caused last-minute setbacks, leading to a quickly written retraction at the end of book three. See also WIERUS. 
  • Aherom: A demon mentioned in the 1898 Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Aherom is listed among a vast number of other demons who serve the four infernal princes ofthe cardinal directions: Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Akanef: In his 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, occultist S. L. Mathers suggests that the name of this demon is related to a Hebrew word for “wing.” Akanef serves beneath the arch-demons Astaroth and Asmodeus and is summoned as a part of the Holy Guardian Angel working. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Akesoli: A demon whose name means “the pain-bringer,” at least according to occultist S.L. MacGregor Mathers. In his 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Akesoli is said to serve the demon-king Amaimon. Another spelling os this name is Akefely. See also AMAIMON, MATHERS.
  • Akium: Mathers takes this demon’s name to mean “certainty.” In his 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, he lists Akium among the demonic servitors ruled by Beelzebub. Akahim is a variant spelling of this name. See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Akoros: A demon said o serve the infernal king Amaimon in the Sacred Maic of Abramelin the Mage. According to the Mathers translation of this work, Akoros comes from a Greek root meaning “overthrowers of authority.” In the Peter Hammer edition of this work, the name of this demon is given as Abarok. See also AMAIMON, MATHERS.
  • Akton: A demon of disease that afflicts the ribs and lower back of mortals, tormenting them with aches and pains. He is one of thirty-six demons associated with the decans of the zodiac named in the pseudepigraphal Testament of Solomon. According to this text, Akton can be put to flight with the names Marmaraôth and Sabaôth. Although the origins and meaning of Marmaraôth is unclear, Sabaôth is one of the Hebrew names of God and means “Lord of Hosts.” See also SOLOMON.
  • Alagas: In Mather’s 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, the demon Alagas is said to have a name meaning “the Wanderer.” Alagas anda  host of other demonic entities appear in a lengthy list of beings who serve beneath Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon, the four demonic princes of the cardinal directions. Alagas is invoked as a part of the process of establishing a dialogue with an entity known as the Holy Guardian Angel. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Alan: Ordinarily a rather prosaic name, in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Alan appears as a demon whos erves Astaroth. The name of this demon is given at Alafy in a version of the Abramelin material kept at the Wolfenbüttal library. The version kept at the Sächsische Landesbibliothek (Saxon State Library), in Dresden, Germany, spells the name Alasi. See also ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Alastor: A vengeance demon named in Collin de Plancy’s Dictionnaire Infernal. In this text, de Plancy indicates that Alastor was known in the Zoroastrian tradition as the Executioner. Although the Zoroastrian connection is dubitable, in the tradition of the ancient Greeks, Alastor was indeed a spirit of vengeance. Zeus was known as Zeus Alastor whenever he assumed a vengeful form. In Waite’s presentation of the Grand Grimoire from his 1910 Book of Black Magic and Pacts, Alastor is described as Hell’s Commissioner of Public Works. He is also portrayed as an infernal judge. These attributions tie back to the work of Charles Berbiguier, a self-styled demonologist from the early nineteenth century. See also BERBIGUIER, DE PLANCY, WAITE. 
  • Alath: A truly fearsome spirit whose name appears in the extra-biblicalTestament of Solomon. Alath is the demon of illness said to attack children. He steals their breath, causing asthma, coughs, and other labored breathing. He is the twenty-first demon of those associated with the thirty-six decans of the zodiac, and he is said to have the body of a man with the head of a beast. According to the Testament of Solomon, he can be driven off by invoking the name Rorêx. See also SOLOMON.
  • Albhadur: A chief duke in the hierarchy of Raysiel, an infernal king of the north. Albhadur has fifty lesser spirits that minister to him, and he is connected with the hours of the day. Described as an aerial spirit, Albhadur has a nature that is more subtle than physical, and he is not early perceived with the naked eye. The Ars Theurgia recommends that he be viewed with the help of a stone crystal or scrying glass. See also ARS THEURGIA, RAYSIEL.
  • Alibany: According to Driscoll’s translation of the Sworn Book, this demon is connected to the element earth and the direction north. He serves the infernal king Albunalich. Like his master, he is said to have a fondness for gold and precious gems. He will greedily guard these, frustrating unworthy souls that seek the treasures of the earth. See also ALBUNALICH, SWORN BOOK.
  • Alleborith: A demon named in the Testament of Solomon, Alleborith is one of thirty-six demons associated with the decans of the zodiac. Alleborith is said to appear with the head of a beast and the body of a man. While most of his infernal brethren have the power of afflict humanity with terrible diseases, Alleborith has an unusual and very specific power: he can cause people to choke on fish bones. As demonic powers go, that’s a pretty strange one. Perhaps because this ability is fairly minor in the grand scheme of things, no name is given, angelic or otherwise, that would put Alleborith to flight. One assumes that the Heimlich maneuver will work just as efficiently on demonically-inspired fish bones as not. See also SOLOMON.
  • Alluph: The name of this demon may be derived from the word aleph, the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet. In the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Alluph is said to serve all four infernal princes of the cardinal directions equally, and therefore equally partakes of their powers. Mathers parses his name as meaning either “duke” or “bull.” “Bull” is far more likely, as the pictograph that ultimately became the letter aleph originally represented the head of a bull. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Almadiel: When this demon manifests, he takes the form of a monstrous serpent with a human head. He is bound to the hours of the night and he despises the day. He will only manifest when darkness has blanketed the land. He serves the wandering duke Buriel, and his name and seal appear in the second book of theLesser Key of Solomon, known as the Ars Theurgia. Almadiel is hated by all other spirits, save for the others of his hierarchy. Within his own evil hierarchy, he commands a total of eight hundred and eighty lesser spirits. See also ARS THEURGIA, BURIEL.
  • Almasor: In the Ars Theurgia, Almasor is described as an infernal knight goverened by the wandering demon-prince, Pirichiel. According to that same text, Almasor is said to have no fewer than two thousand ministering spirits that attend him. See also ARS THEURGIA, PIRICHIEL.
  • Almesiel: One of the demonds in service to Amenadiel, the infernal Emperor of the West. Almesiel’s name and seal appear in the 1999 Henson translation of theArs Theurgia. According to this text, Almesiel holds the rank of due and commands three thousand eight hundred and eighty lesser spirits. See also AMENADIEL, ARS THEURGIA.
  • Almiras: In Mathers’ translation of the Clavicula Salomonis, Almiras is described as the “Master of Invisibility.” Together with a number of his infernal ministers, Almiras is invocated in a spell for becoming invisible. He appears in association with the same spell in Mathers’ translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also CLAVICULA SALOMONIS, MATHERS.
  • Almodar: One of twelve infernal dukes who serve the wandering prince Soleviel. Half serve one year and the other half serve the next, thus spreading out the workload among them. Almodar commands one thousand eight hundred and forty lesser spirits of his own, and his name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia, a magickal text that deals with spirits tied to the points of the compass. See alsoARS THEURGIA, SOLVEVIEL.
  • Almoel: A duke in the court of the demon-prince Usiel. Almoel commands twenty lesser spirits and has the power to reveal hidden things. According to the Ars Theurgia, where his name and seal appear, Almoel is connected with the hours of the night and will only appear to mortals during this time.
  • Alocer: In the Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, Alocer is described as a great and strong duke. He appears first as a soldier riding a horse. He has a lion’s face with fiery eyes. His skin is red and when he speaks, he has a loud and booming voice. Among his powers, he has the ability to teach astronomy and the liberal sciences. He can also provide familiar spirits. This demon appears in Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft, where his name is spelled Allocer. He is said to have thirty-six legions of lesser spirits under his command. In the Goetia, he is called Alloces and he is said to have a red and leonine face. According to the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is governed by the angel Imamiah. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Alogil: A demon named in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Alogil is one of many demons who serve beneath Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon, the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions. There are several manuscripts that present the Abramelin material. In the fifteenth-century French manuscript translated by occultist S. L. MacGregor Mathers in 1898, Alogil’s name is given instead as Plegit. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Aloson: One of the demonic servitors ruled by the infernal lord Beelzebub. In the fifteenth-century French version of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, the name of this demon is given as Plison. This spelling led translator Samuel Mathers to assume the demon’s name was related to a Greek word meaning “to swim.” See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Alpas: A demon whose name appears in connection with Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon. These are the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions as described in the Sacred Mage of Abramelin the Mage. Alpas serves beneath these four princes, answering to any of the four of them. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Altanor: A demonic servant of Beelzebub, named in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the fifteenth-century French manuscript sourced by Mathers for his translation of this work, the name of this demon is spelledAlcanor. See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Althes: A demon who appears by name in the fifteenth-century magickal text known as the Munich Handbook. Althes is summoned as part of a spell intended to allow the magician to reveal the identity of a thief. The demon is also called up in order to aid in divination. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Althor: A servant of the infernal prince Dorochiel, Althor is named in the seventeenth-century magickal text known as the Ars Theurgia. Here he is listed, and a dozen demons given the rank of chief duke and said to appear in the hours before noon. Through Dorochiel, he is associated with the west. As a demon of rank, he commands forty ministering spirits of his own. See also ARS THEURGIA,DOROCHIEL.
  • Altramat: In the fifteenth-century Munich Handbook, Altramat is one of several demons said to guard the cardinal directions. He is named in a spell of divination that uses a young and virginal boy as the intermediary to the spirits. See alsoMUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Alugor: According to the Munich Handbook, this due of Hell as fifty legions at his command. When summoned, he appears as a knight. He is splendidly outfitted and he approaches the magician bearing a lance, a scepter, and a banner. A martial demon, Alugor is especially skilled at providing warriors for protection or aggression. When requested, he can call knights to fight for the magician. He is also skilled at more subtle acts of conquest, for he can whisper in the ear of any knight, king, or marquis the world over and make them favorably disposed to the magician. In addition to all this, Alugor can also reveal the mysteries of the occult and foretell the outcome of duels. Compare his name and powers to those of the Goetic demon Eligor. See also ELIGOR, MUNICH HANDBOOK.

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