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This tumblr is for anyone who is interested in, or practices, the darker aspects of the Craft, or the oft misunderstood rites of Santería, Voodoo, Asatrú, and everything in between. We discuss the maligned deities, the disparaged paths, and most of all, balancing the dark with the light. For how do we know when the sun sets if the moon doth not rise?

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Demonology: Demons AM-AZ
  • Amaimon: In the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Amaimon is said to know the past, present and future. He can cause visions an enable people to fly. He provides familiar spirits and can cause other spirits to appear and assume diverse forms. He can summon protection and revive the dead. The Abramelin material identifies him as one of the four infernal rulers of the cardinal directions. His domain is the south. In this text, he is one of eight sub-princes summoned to serve the magician as part of the Holy Guardian Angel rite. Mathers relates his name to a Greek root meaning “terrible violence and vehemence.” According to both Mathers and Agrippa, Amaimon’s equivalent in Jewish lore is the demon Mahazael. Scot’s Discoverie of the Witchcraft mentions that Amaimon is known for his dangerous, putrid breath and describes a technique of protection where conjurors wear a magick ring and hold this against their faces to ward away Amaimon’s harm. The same technique is advised for the infernal king Bileth. Mathers also notes Amaimon’s reputation for fiery or poisonous breath. He appears in Wierus’ Pseudomonarchia Daemonum under the name Amaymonis. Here he seems to be a chief among evil spirits. He is mentioned in connection with both Asmodeus and Bileth, and he is tied to deception and abominable practices. Although he is associated with the south in the Abramelin material, Amaimon is listed as the “King of the East” in Dr. Rudd’s Treatise on Angel Magic. Here, the name of this demon is rendered Amaymon. See also AGRIPPA, ASMODEUS, BILETH, MAHAZAEL, MATHERS, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Amalek: A demonic being named in the collection of Jewish lore known as the Zohar. According to this text, Amalek is the greatest impurity. He is credited with the ability to poison a person so thoroughly that he can bring about the death of the soul. In the Zohar, Amalek is equated to the fallen angel Samael. Although identified as separate entities, they are nevertheless presented as being the same essential being. Notably, Samael’s name is sometimes translated as “poison of God.” See also SAMAEL.
  • Amalin: A demonic servant in the hierarchy beneath the reater demons Astaroth and Asmodeus. Amalin’s name appears in the Mathers 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Aman: According to the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Aman is a demonic servant of Astaroth. Both demons are invoked as a part of the Holy Guardian Angel ritual central to the Abramelin material. See also ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Amandiel: A demon is the court of prince Usiel, whose name appears in the Ars Theurgia. Both Amandiel and Usiel serve the greater demon Amenadiel. Amandiel’s name may be an intentional variation of Amenadiel, showing his fealty to this greater scion of Hell. Through his association with Amenadiel, Amandiel is connected with the west. Although the Ars Theurgia offers little on the origin or significance of his name, it does tell us that Amandiel is a demon connected with the hours of the day. He holds that rank of chief duke and has thirty lesser spirits to serve him. He excels at hiding away treasures so they may not be stolen, and he can also reveal treasure hidden away through magickal means. See also AMENADIEL, ARS THEURGIA, USIEL.
  • Amasiel: A demon in the court of the wandering prince Menadiel. Amasiel is companion to the infernal duke Dasiel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Amasiel follows Drasiel in all things. As Drasiel may only appear in the third hour of the day, Amasiel must then follow in the fourth hour. See also ARS THEURGIA, DRASIEL, MENADIEL.
  • Ambolin: In the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Ambolin is listed as one of several demonic servitors in the hierarchy beneath Astaroth and Asmodeus. According to Mathers’ 1898 translation of this work, the name of this demon means “tending unto nothingness.” See also ASMODEUS, ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Ambri: One of twelve dukes specifically named in association with Caspiel, the infernal Emperor of the South. Ambri’s name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia, a book that teaches how to summon and compel a series of “aerial spirits” connected to the points of the compass. Ambri and his companions are reputed to be truculent and difficult to work with. If charge in the name of their direct superior, however, they can supposedly be bent to the conjuror’s will. Ambri rarely manifests alone as he has two thousand two hundred and sixty lesser spirits under his command. See also ARS THEURGIA, CASPIEL.
  • Amchison: ONe of several demons mentioned in connection with the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage whose name varies significantly between different versions of this work. In the version kept at the Wolfenbüttal library, the name is spelled Arakison. In the Peter Hammer edition, the name is Arakuson. And in the version of the Abramelin material kept in the Dresden library, the name appears as Aracuson. As all of these manuscripts are merely copies of a lost original, there is no way of knowing the proper spelling. Amchison or Arakuson is said to serve under the greater demon Magoth. See also MAGOTH, MATHERS.
  • Amduscias: This demon is said to first manifest in the form of a unicorn. According to WIerus’ Pesudomonarchia Daemonum, he can also take the form of a man. He has the power to cause trees to bend and sway, and he can also conjure a host of musical instruments that will play invisibly on their own. In Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft, he is accorded the rank of duke and is said to rule over a total of twenty-nine legions. He is one of the seventy-two demons of the Goetia; and in the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is said to be constrained by the angel Eiael. His name is alternately spelled Amducias, and Amdusias. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Amediet: An infernal duke who has two thousand two hundred lesser spirits at his command. Amediet serves the demon Icosiel, who is described in the Ars Theurgia as a wandering prince of the air. Amediet prefers to manifest in houses, but he is bound to appear only during a specific time every day. If the day is divided into fifteen equal parts, then Amediet belongs to the hours and minutes that fall into the seventh portion of time. See also ARS THEURGIA, ICOSIEL.
  • Amen: In the Ars Theurgia, Amen is named as a demon in the hierarchy of prince Usiel. It is tempting to relate this demon to the ancient Egyptian deity Amen (also spelled Amon,) but there is no indication in the text that the two are conneted. Amen and his master Usiel both serve the infernal emperor Amenadiel, and Amen’s name may relate more to this superior demon than to any ancient deities. Through Amenadiel, he is affiliated with the west. Regardless of the origin of this name, Amen is reputed to be a chief duke who holds sway over forty lesser spirits. He has the power to reveal hidden treasures and he excels at hiding things himself so they may not be discovered or stolen. He serves his master during the hours of the day. His name is sometimes spelled Amon, although the Ars Theurgia does not seem to relate him to the Goetic demon of the same name. See also AMENADIEL, AMON, ARS THEURGIA, GOETIA, USIEL.
  • Amenadiel: In the Ars Theurgia, Amenadiel is named as the primary Emperor of the West, and he governs that point of the compass with a massive retinue of loyal spirits. Amenadiel is said to have no fewer than three hundred great dukes and five hundred lesser dukes to carry out his commands, as well as a vast array of infernal ministers. He can be called in any hour of the day or night, and he appears in the Ars Theurgia along with the sigils and names of twelve of his dukes. As with all of the spirits named in the Ars Theurgia, Amenadiel possesses an airy nature and is best conjured into a scrying glass or crystal stone so that his true form can be seen. See also ARS THEURGIA.
  • Ameta: A demon connected with the hours of the day, Ameta serves the infernal prince Usiel. Holding the rank of duke, he has forty lesser spirits beneath him. According to the Ars Theurgia, Ameta can find hidden things, especially those that have been magickally enchanted. He can also lay enchantments of his own, obscuring treasure and other items so that they may not be discovered or stolen. See also ARS THEURGIA, USIEL.
  • Amiblel: A demon in the service of Demoriel, the infernal Emperor of the North. According to the Ars Theurgia, Amiblel has no fewer than one thousand one hundred and forty lesser spirits at his command. He holds the rank of duke and should be called only in the first two hours of the day. See also ARS THEURGIA, DEMORIEL.
  • Amiel: One of several chief dukes said to serve the demon Malgaras during the hours of the night. Through Malgaras, he is affiliated with the court of the west. He has thirty lesser spirits under his command. Amiel appears again in the same work under the rule of the demon Asyriel. Here, Amiel is depicted as a chief duke with forty lesser spirits who serve him. He is still connected to the hours of the night. Through Asyriel, this version of Amiel is connected with the south. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASYRIEL, MALGARAS.
  • Amitzrapava: A transliterated Hebrew name of the night-demon Lilith. According to Jewish lore, Lilith was the first wife of Adam, cast from the Garden for refusing to submit to her husband. She harbored an unnatural hatred for mothers in childbirth and newly born babes, and she was believed to roam the night, seeking to do harm. Scribing her names upon an amulet was thought to protect against her attacks, and a number of such amulets have survived to the modern day. Author T. Schrire, in his 1966 work Hebrew Magic Amulets, gathered together a number of Lilith’s traditional talismanic names. Amitzrapava is only one of these many names. See also LILITH.
  • Amolon: A demon named in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Amolon is supposed to serve beneath the greater demon Beelzebub. Amolon’s name appears in close proximity to that of another demon, Lamolon, and the similarities between the two may suggest that they are not separate demons but two variant spellings of the same name. See also BEELZEBUB, LAMOLON, MATHERS. 
  • Amon: Also spelled Aamon and Ammon, this demon rules as a marquis over forty legions of devils. He appears as a wolf with a serpent’s tale. In Wierus’ Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, the wolf is said to vomit flame. In his translation of the Discoverie of Witchcraft, Scot changes this slightly, saying instead that the wolf only breathes fire. Amon can be commanded to assume the form of a man, but even in this case, his monstrous nature still shows forth. Here the texts diverge again. The Psuedomonarchia tells us that Amon’s human form has dog’s teeth and the head of a night hawk. Scot says he appears with dog’s teeth and the head of a raven. The differences are slight, but significant. Both texts agree that this demon can speak of the past, present, and future. He also reconciles friends and goes and procures favor for those brave enough to call him up. He is named as the seventh of seventy-two demons in the Goetia. In the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is further said to bow to the power of the angel Achasiah. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Amoyr: A demon named in the Ars Theurgia from Henson’s translation of the complete Lemegeton. Amoyr is identified as one of twelve infernal dukes who serve the demon-kind Maseriel during the hours of the night. He has thirty lesser spirits at his command. He is connected with the direction of the south. See also ARS THEURGIA, MASERIEL.
  • Amriel: A demon ruled by the infernal prince Soleviel, a wandering spirit of the air. According to the Ars Theurgia, Amiel has one thousand eight hundred and forty lesser spirits at his command. He serves his infernal prince only one year out of every two. See also ARS THEURGIA, SOLEVIEL.
  • Anadir: The “flayer.” Anadir is a servant of the demon Ariton named in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the Mathers translation of the text, the demon’s name is spelled Anader. See also ARITON, MATHERS.
  • Anael: A so-called “spirit of power” named in the Mathers translation of the Grimoire of Armadel. In this text, Anael is said to reveal all mysteries of the past, present, and future. He responds quickly to his invocation and can further teach the science of merchants. Anael also appears in the Ars Theurgia as a demon ruled by Gediel. According to this text, he is connected with the hours of the night and commands a total of twenty ministering spirits. See also ARS THEURGIA, GEDIEL.
  • Anagotos: One of several demons said to serve the infernal rulers Magoth and Kore. Anagotos appears in Mathers’ translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the Abramelin manuscripts kept at the Dresden and Wolfenbüttal libraries, the name of this demon is spelled Anagnostos, which might shed more light upon its original meaning. This name seems Greek in origin. Gnostos means “knowledge,” and the Greek prefix ana- means “against.” Thus, this name likely means “against knowledge” or “not knowing.” See also KORE, MAGOTH, MATHERS.
  • Ananel: A fallen angel who chose to abandon Heaven in pursuit of a mortal wife. Ananel’s name appears in the apocryphal Book of Enoch. He is listed among the “chiefs of tens” who served beneath Shemyaza and Azazel. These chiefs were essentially the lieutenants of the Watcher Angels, heavenly beings sometimes also known as the Grigori. See also AZAZEL, SHEMYAZA, WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Anatreth: According to the Testament of Solomon, Anatreth is a demon if disease. He is associated with the thirty-six decans of the zodiac. He torments humanity with pains in the belly, making it seem as if a person’s entrails are being burnt and torn asunder. As with all of the zodiac demons named in the Testament of Solomon, Anatreth can be driven away with certain holy names. For this particular demon, the names Arara and Charara will cause him to flee. See also SOLOMON.
  • Andras: A violent demon reputed to be able to slaughter the master, servants, and all assistants of a household. This statement in Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft is usually taken to mean that andras is sent out to kill others. In the same text, Andras is said to take the form of an angel with the head of a black night-raven. He appears wielding a deadly sharp sword and riding upon the back of a fierce black wolf. He is given the title “Author of Discords.” In the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, there is a slightly different entry on Andras. According to this text, the demon holds the rank of marquis. His purpose is to sow discord among men, but the statement about slaughter is written as a warning. Apparently, Andras has a particularly violent temperament, and those who are not careful when dealing with him run the risk of being killed to the last man. Fortunately, the text provides the name of the angel that constrains Andras. That name is Anarel. Andras is also mentioned in Wierus’ Pseudomonarchia Daemonum. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Andrealphus: A great marquis in the hosts of Hell, Andrealphus is said to take the form of a peacock. He can transform men into birds. In addition to this, he can teach geometry, astronomy, and any discipline dealing with measurement. He appears in both Wierus’s Psuedomonarchia Daemonum and Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft, where he is said to govern thirty legions. Andraelphus is also one of seventy-two demons listed in the Goetia. In the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is said to be  constrained in the name of the angel Demabiah. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Androcos: A demon named in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In his 1898 translation of this work, occultist Samuel Mathers suggests that this name means “orderer of men,” from a Greek root. Androcos is said to serve the infernal prince Ariton. See also ARITON, MATHERS.
  • Andromalius: The last of the seventy-two demons named in the Goetia. Andromalius is absent from both Wierus’s Pseudomonarchia Daemonum and Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft, books that otherwise contain the names and descriptions of the majority of the Goetic demons. No explanation for this omission is offered within the texts. According to the Goetia, Andromalius is a great and mighty earl. He has thirty-six legions of infernal spirits under his command, and he manifests in the form of a man holding a serpent in one hand. Andromalius is a demon of justice and revenge. He is said to have the power to punish thieves and other wicked individuals. He can bring a thief back to the place he stole from, and he can also bring about the return of the stolen goods. He reveals wickedness and underhanded dealings and can also uncover hidden treasure.  According to the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is constrained with the name of the angel Mumiah. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Andros: A demon who often assumes the form of a many-headed dragon. Each of the heads on the dragon is that of a virgin witha  soft and beauteous face. Andros serves as chief duke to the wandering prince Macariel as a described in the Ars Theurgia. According to this text, Andros is not bound by any particular hour of the day, but may make his appearence freely during the day or during the night. Andros is also a Greek word, meaning “man.” Compare to the Goetic demon Andras. See also ARS THEURGIA, MACARIEL.
  • Andruchiel: A demon under the rule of the wandering prince Bidiel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Andruchiel is a great duke with two thousand and four hundred inferior spirits under his command. When he manifests he assumes a human shape, beautiful and radiant. See also ARS THEURGIA, BIDIEL.
  • Andyron: In the fifteenth-century Munich Handbook, Andyron is one of several demons summoned to assist in a spel of divination. Andyron can help a scryer see all manner of secret and hidden things. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Aniel: A mighty duke in the hierarchy of the infernal prince Cabariel. He is affiliated with the west. Aniel has fifty ministering spirits that carry out his will. He is tied to the hours of the day and will appear between dawn and dusk. ANiel’s name, as well as the seal that can bind and compel him, appears in the second book of the Lesser Key of Solomon, known as the Ars Theurgia. In this same book, Aniel also appears in the court of the demon Aesliel. Here, he holds the rank of chie president. He has thirty principal spirits who serve him and another twenty lesser spirits at his command. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASELIEL, CABARIEL.
  • Anituel: A demon named in the Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses. This magickal text, purporting to date to the days of the biblical Patriarch himself but actually written in the 1800s, is fraught with internal inconsistencies. Chief among them is the exact spelling of this demon’s name. On his sigil, the name appears as Aniouel, while above the sigil the name is rendered Antquelis. The three vastly different versions of the demon’s name, all presented together in the same manuscript, are somewhat baffling, and it is difficult to identify which name is strictly correct. Regardless of the quandary presented by its three different names, the Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses explains that this prince of spirits will appear as a serpent of Paradise when summoned, assuming much the same guise as the evil spirit that tempted Eve. Among his offices, Anituel oversees honors among men, conferring these or great wealth, as his summoner commands. 
  • Anostêr: According to the Testament of Solomon, Anostêr is one of thirty-six demons tied to the decans of the zodiac. Specifically, he is number twenty-nine. All of the zodiac demons named in the Testament of Solomon are depicted as disease bearing spirits that torment humanity with specific ailments. In Anostêr’s case, he has the power to afflict his victims with infections of the uterine and urinary tracts. He is also attributed with the ability to cause something called “uterine mania” in the text - which seems to suggest that he is, in fact, the demon behind PMS. As great as the suffering Anostêr may bring, he can be driven away from his victims through the use of the name Marmaraô. See also SOLOMON.
  • Ansoel: A demon in the court of prince Usiel who serves in the hours of the night. Ansoel has the power to hide precious objects, protecting them from thieves. He can also reveal things that have been hidden away through similar magick. In the Ars Theurgia, he is said to hold the rank of duke with a total of forty subordinate spirits serving beneath him. See also ARS THEURGIA, USIEL.
  • Aonyr: A duke in the service of the infernal king Pamersiel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Aonyr is by nature both evil and false. He should never be trusted with secret matters. His aggressive nature, however, can be harnessed for good. Aonyr and all his fellows in the court of Pamersiel are useful for driving other spirits away from haunted houses. Through Pamersiel, he is affiliated with the east. See also ARS THEURGIA, PAMERSIEL.
  • Apelout: A spirit named in Peterson’s edition of the Grimorium Verum. According to this text, Apelout is invoked in a spell intended to achieve invisibility. See also GRIMORIUM VERUM.
  • Apiel: This nocturnal demon is one of a thousand chief dukes said to serve the infernal king Symiel. He is part of the larger hierarchy of demons associated with the north, at least according to the Ars Theurgia. In that text, Apiel is described as possessing a very obstinate nature. He is reluctant to appear to  mortals and, when he does appear, it is only at night. See also ARS THEURGIA, SYMIEL.
  • Apilki: A demon in the service of Amaimon, identified in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage as one of the rulers of the four cardinal directions. In the 1898 Mathers translation of this work, the name of this demon is translated “the misleader,” from a Greek root. The name is also spelled Apelki. See also AMAIMON, MATHERS.
  • Apolhun: A servant of the princes Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon, Apolhun is mentioned in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In his translation of this work, Mathers points out the similarity between this demon’s name and that of Apollyon, a fallen angel mentioned in the Book of Revelation. Because of the similarities, Mathers suggested that the name of this demon means “the Destroyer.” See also AMAIMON, APOLLYON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Apolin: A demon named in the fifteenth-century Munich Handbook. He is reputed to be an infernal instructor with the power to teach on any subject. He is called upon in a spell for increasing knowledge, where he is said to appear at night in dreams to impart everything he knows. The name of this demon is very likely derived from Apollo, the Greek god of music, healing, prophecy, and the sun. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Apollyon: The so-called “angel of the Abyss.” Apollyon is the Greek name for Abaddon, an angel named in the biblical Book of Revelation. See also ABADDON.
  • Apormenos: A demon named in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. According to this text, Apormenos serves the demon Astaroth. See also ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Apot: A demon who serves beneath Asmodeus and Magoth in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Mathers’ source manuscript from fifteenth-century France is only one of two versions of the Abramelin material that contains this particular hierarchy. The other, a version from 1608 kept at the Wolfenbüttal library, gives a totally different spelling for this demon’s name, to the point where it may well be a different demon entirely. The corresponding name in that text is Sochen. See also ASMODEUS, MAGOTH, MATHERS.
  • Aquiel: A demon said to preside over Sundays. Acquiel is named in Petersons edition of the Grimorium Verum. See also GRIMORIUM VERUM
  • Arach: the first of twelve demons said to serve the infernal king Maseriel by night. Arach holds the title of duke and has thirty lesser spirits under his command. He is named in the Ars Theurgia, where he appears in the hierarchy of the south. His name is very likely derived from a Greek word meaning “spider.” See also ARS THEURGIA, MASERIEL.
  • Araex: A demon serving the infernal ruler Astaroth Araex is named in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the 1725 Peter Hammer edition of the same material, this demon’s name is given as Targoe. In the 1720 version currently kept at the Dresden library, it is spelled Taraoc. There is a great deal of variation between the different Abramelin manuscripts. Much of it can be attributed to scribal error. See also ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Arafos: A demon of the night who serves the infernal king Symiel in the hierarchy of the north. Arafos is attended by fifty ministering spirits. His name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia. According to this text, Arafos is a stubborn and willful demon who is reluctant to manifest to mortals. See also ARS THEURGIA, SYMIEL.
  • Arakiba: A fallen angel named in the Book of Enoch. According to this text, Arakiba was one of the “chief of tens” of the Watcher Angels. These angelic chiefs led the Watchers, or Grigori, in their task to watch over humanity in the days before the Food. Arakiba fell through sins of the flesh, taking a mortal wife when such a union between heavenly and earthly stock was forbidden. See also WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Araquiel: A fallen angel who guarded the secrets of the signs of the earth. Araquiel is named in the Book of Enoch, where he is said to have fallen after giving into the temptation of beautiful mortal women. One of two hundred Watcher Angels charged with overseeing humanity, Araquiel abandoned his heavenly duties to raise a family instead. Although the knowledge was forbidden, he taught the signs of the earth to humans, further breaking his trust with Heaven. See also WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Arath: This demon is called upon to assist in the discovery of thieves. He is also summoned so that he may lend his power to a spell for divination. He appears by name in the fifteenth-century Munich Handbook. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Aratiel: A chief president in the hierarchy of the demon-prince Aseliel. Through his service to Aseliel, Aratiel is tied to the direction of the east. He holds the rank of chief president and has thirty principal spirits and twenty ministering spirits at his command. According to the Ars Theurgia, he manifests in a form that is courtly, courteous, and very beautiful to behold. He will only appear during the hours of the day. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASELIEL.
  • Aratron: A demon named in the Mathers translation of the Grimoire of Armadel. Aratron is said to reveal knowledge of the soul. He also possesses details about the rebellion of the angels and the subsequent War in Heaven. There is a warning in the Grimoire of Armadel suggesting that it is unwise to spend too much time with any of this demon’s familiar spirits. The name of this demon also appears in Rudd’s Treatise on Angel Magic. Here, he is an Olympic spirit connected with Saturn. The name Aratron may be a variation on the demon Ariton. See also ARITON, MATHERS, RUDD.
  • Arayl: A servant of the demon-king Raysiel, Arayl holds the rank of chief duke. He has forty lesser spirits beneath him. Arayl is a demon of the night and he will only appear during the hours between dusk and dawn. His name and seal appears in the Ars Theurgia, a book that deals with a variety of Spirits connected with the points of the compass. Through Raysiel, he is connected with the direction north. See also ARS THEURGIA, RAYSIEL.
  • Arbatel of Magic: Sometimes also known as simply the Arbatel. this text, first published in Latin in Basel, Switzerland, in 1575, is distinguished as one of the few grimoires that deals exclusively with transcendent magick. The Arbatel deals primarily with planetary or Olympiam spirits and has a distinct lack of demonic entities. It is not to be confused with either the Almadel, included in the Lemegeton, or the Armadel, frequently described as the Grimoire of Armadel.
  • Arbiel: A demon named in the Ars Theurgia. According to this text, Arbiel is one of twelve dukes in service to the infernal prince Hydriel. Hydriel governs no specific direction, and thus he and all the demons who serve him are said to wander through the points of the compass. Described as an aerial spirit, Arbiel has a subtle form and is best viewed in a crystal stone or scrying glass. When he manifests, he appears as a serpent with a woman’s head and he has a fondness for places that are wet or swampy. See also ARS THEURGIA, HYDRIEL.
  • Archidemath: According to the fifteenth-century Munich Handbook, this demon is a guardian of one of the cardinal directions. He must be properly invoked as part of a divination for revealing the true identity of a thief. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Arcisat: A duke of the demon Asyriel. Arcisat appears in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to rule over twenty lesser spirits of his own. He is connected with the direction of the south and with the hours of the day. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASYRIEL.
  • Arcon: This demon’s name likely derives from a Greek verb meaning “to rule.” Arcon appears in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, where he is said to serve the infernal lord Beelzebub. See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Arean: A demon in the hierarchy of the east, as outlined in the Ars Theurgia. Arean serves the infernal prince Aseliel in the capacity of “chief president.” He holds sway over thirty principal spirits and another twenty ministering spirits. He is tied to the hours of the day and will only manifest during this time. When he appears, he assumes a form that is courtly in manner and beautiful to behold. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASELIEL.
  • Arepach: One of several demons associated with the points of the compass, at least according to the Ars Theurgia. Arepach serves in the hierarchy of the demon-king Raysiel, who rules in the north. Described as having a particularly stubborn and evil nature, Arepach is a demon of the night, only manifesting during the hours of darkness from dusk until dawn. He holds the rank of chief duke, and accordingly has twenty other lesser spirits under his command. See also ARS THEURGIA, RAYSIEL.
  • Argilon: A demon said to serve the infernal ruler Astaroth. As a servant of Astaroth, Argilon wields all the same powers as his infernal master, including the ability to cause visions and to expound upon secret matters pertaining to the past, present, and future. Argilon’s name appears in all four surviving manuscripts of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also ASTAROTH, MATHERS.
  • Aridiel: In the demonic hierarchy connected with the points of the compass as outlined in the Ars Theurgia, Aridiel serves beneath the demon-king Caspiel, Emperor of the South. Holding the rank of due, Aridiel is one of twelve demons of such rank given the honor of attending directly upon Caspiel. He has no fewer than two thousand two hundred and sixty ministering spirits under his command. See also ARS THEURGIA, CASPIEL.
  • Ariel: Appears as a treasure-finding spirit in the Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses. He is included among the Seven Great Princes of Spirits who, the text warns, include among their number some of the highest-ranking angels to have fallen from grace. In wider literature on angels and demons, Ariel appears among the fallen as well as those still loyal to the Throne of God. Ariel’s name means “Lion of God,” and this leonine aspect is often reflected in magickal texts - where he is frequently described as possessing the head of a lion.
  • Arifiel: A demon who serves Carnesiel, the infernal Emperor of the East. Arifiel holds the rank of duke and can be summoned individually or alongside his immediate superior. Both Arifiel and Carnesiel appear in an extensive hierarchy of demons associated with the points of the compass, as outlined in the Ars Theurgia. See also ARS THEURGIA, CARNESIEL.
  • Arioth: A demon said to be ruled jointly by both Magoth and Kore, at least in the 1898 Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In other versions of this text, Arioth serves only the demon Magoth. The name of this demon is likely a variation on the Hebrew name Arioch, which means “fierce lion.” Arioch appears as a demon in several grimoires. See also KORE, MAGOTH, MATHERS.
  • Ariton: Sometimes also known as Egin or Egyn, this demon’s name likely derives from the Greek word arhreton, which Mathers defines as meaning “secret” or “mysterious.” IN the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Ariton is listed as one of eight sub-princes in an extended demonic hierarchy that includes such familiar faces as Beelzebub, Asmodeus, and Astaroth. He is also named as one of the four demons who preside over the cardinal directions. Under his alternate name of Egyn, he oversees the north. According to both Mathers and Agrippa, Ariton’s equivalent in Jewish lore is the demon Azael. In the Abramelin material, this demon is attributed with the power to discover hidden treasure. He knows the past, present, and future, and can cause people to have visions. He can make spirits appear and take any form, and he can also give familiars. In addition, Ariton is reputed to have the powers to revive the dead. He reveals the identities of thieves, gifts people with the power of flight, and can make warriors manifest to protect his charges. Notably, a demon with the name Aratron appears as the spirit of Saturn in several works. See also AGRIPPA, ARATRON, AZAEL, EGYN, MATHERS.
  • Armadiel: A demon who rules as King of the Northeast, Armadiel is third in rank beneath the great infernal Emperor of the North, Demoriel. Many demons who hold a similar rank have scores of lesser dukes serving beneath them. Armadiel, however, only has fifteen chief dukes who carry out his wishes. Their names and sigils can be found alongside his in the Ars Theurgia. Aramdiel can also be found in a list of demons from Trithemius’s Steganographia. See also ARS THEURGIA, DEMORIEL.
  • Armany: A demon associated with the eastern point of the compass, Armany serves in the hierarchy of Carnesiel, the infernal Emperor of the East. According to the Ars Theurgia, Armany holds the rank of duke. See also ARS THEURGIA, CARNESIEL.
  • Armaros: One of two hundred Watcher Angels said to have left Heaven in pursuit of mortal wives. Also known as the Grigori, the tale of the Watchers appears in the Book of Enoch as well as in the Jewish Haggadah. In addition to their sins of the flesh, these fallen angels were said to have taught forbidden knowledge to humanity before the Flood. Armaros taught the resolving of enchantments. See also WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Armasia: One of several demons said to be ruled by the arch-fiend Beelzebub in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the fifteenth-century French manuscript sourced by Mathers, the demon’s name is spelled Amatia. Mathers suggests that this is derived from a Greek word meaning “ignorance.” See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Armena: One of several chief dukes said to serve beneath the infernal king Raysiel. Armena is described as possessing an airy nature, and he does not easily manifest to mortals without the aid os a scrying glass or crystal. According to the Ars Theurgia, Armena has fifty lesser spirits at his command, and they minister to him during the hours of the day. Through his allegiance to Raysiel, Armena is connected with the court of the north. See also ARS THEURGIA, RAYSIEL.
  • Armesiel: An infernal duke, who has a total of one thousand three hundred and twenty ministering spirits to attend his needs. Armesiel himself serves the wandering prince Emoniel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Armesiel is free to manifest himself during the hours of the day as well as the night. He is drawn to woodlands. Armenadiel is also named in a list of demons from Johannes Trithemius’s Stegannographia, written around 1499. See also ARS THEURGIA, EMONIEL. 
  • Arnochap: A demon tied to the west wind. According to the Peterson translation of the Sworn Book of Honorius, Arnochap functions as a servant of Harthan, the king of the spirits of the moon. Among his powers, he is able to cause rains and to help people prepare for journeys. The angels Gabriel, MIchael, Samyhel, and Atithael have power over him. See also HARTHAN, SWORN BOOK.
  • Aroan: A demon named in the Henson translation of the Ars Theurgia. According to this text, Aroan is a servitor of the demon-king Gediel, who rules under the infernal Emperor of the South. A night-demon, Aroan serves only during the hours of darkness. He holds the rank of duke and has twenty lesser spirits beneath him. See also ARS THEURGIA, GEDIEL.
  • Aroc: In the court of the demon Malgaras, Aroc serves as chief duke. Through Malgaras, he is connected with the direction of the west. According to the Ars Theurgia, Aroc rules over thirty attending spirits. He is appears only in the hours of the night. See also ARS THEURGIA, MALGARAS.
  • Arogor: In his 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Mathers takes the name of this demon to mean “helper.” Arogor is a servant of the arch-fiend Beelzebub. There is a strong likelihood that this demon’s name was originally intended to be a palindrome, as several of the demons beneath Beelzebub have names that can be read the same backward and forward. This variation would be Aragora. The only way to be certain about this, however, would be to find the original manuscript from which all current copies of the Abramelin material stem. See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Arois: A chief duke of the day who commands ten ministering spirits. Arois is named in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to serve the infernal king Malgaras. Through his allegiance to Malgaras, he is connected with the court of the west. See also ARS THEURGIA, MALGARAS.
  • Arolen: According to Mathers, the name of this demon means “strongly agitated,” from the Hebrew language. Mathers’ translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage lists Arolen among the servitors of Beelzebub. See also BEELZEBUB, MATHERS.
  • Arotor: A demon mentioned in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Arotor is said to serve the demon-king Magoth. In his translation of the Abramelin material, Mathers suggests that this demon’s name means “ploughman” or “husbandman” (as in animal husbandry.) In other versions of the work, the name is spelled Arator. This name may have also started out as a magickal palindrome. See also MAGOTH, MATHERS.
  • Arôtosael: A demon of illness and affliction, Arôtosael attacks the eyes, causing blindness and injury. According to the Testament of Solomon, Arôtosael can be put to flight by invoking the name of the angel Uriel. THis angel is not to be confused with the demon Uriel, named in the Ars Theurgia. See also ARS THEURGIA, URIEL.
  • Aroziel: A night-demon loyal to prince Dorochiel. Aroziel appears in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to hold the title of chief duke. Forty lesser spirits exist to carry out his commands He is said to manifest only in a specific hour in the first half of the night. THrough Dorochiel, he is connected with the west. See also ARS THEURGIA, DOROCHIEL.
  • Arpiron: Also known as Harpinon, this demon is said to serve beneath the arch-demon Magoth. Arpiron appears in Mathers’ 1898 translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. He is invoked as part of the Holy Guardian Angel working that is central to that text. See also MAGOTH, MATHERS. 
  • Arrabin: One of several demonic servitors attributed to the rule of Magoth, Arrabin appears in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. In the Mathers translation of this work, he is also said to serve the arch-fiend Kore. In other versions of the Abramelin material, the name of this demon is spelled Arrabim. See also KORE, MAGOTH, MATHERS.
  • Arrnoniel: A demon said to command two thousand and four hundred ministering spirits, Arrnoniel serves in the hierarchy of the infernal prince Bidiel, described as a wandering spirit of the air. A great duke in the Ars Theurgia, Arrnoniel reportedly manifests wearing a pleasing human form. See also ARS THEURGIA, BIDIEL.
  • Ars Theurgia: The second book of the work known as the Lemegeton, or Lesser Key of Solomon. The word theurgia comes from a Greek root meaning “sacramental rite” or “mystery.” Theurgy itself is a type of magick that involves the invocation of beneficent spirits. It was originally practiced by the neo-Platonists. During the Renaissance, theurgy came to have the connotation of white magick, as opposed to the Goetic arts, which were generally viewed as black magick. The Ars Theurgia contains an extensive list of demons associated with the points of the compass. These demons are arranged in hierarchies, and each hierarchy is associated with one of the cardinal directions. An infernal emperor oversees each of the cardinal directions, and the demonic princes, kings, and dukes who serve beneath him are in turn associated with aspects of that direction, such as northwest and south by southeast. The demons of the Ars Theurgia that are associated with a specific direction are thought to rule over that portion of the compass and to be found in that direction when called. Their position is thought of as being fixed. In addition to these fixed points, the Ars Theurgia also contains the names of a number of wandering spirits, which it describes variously as princes and dukes. These wandering princes are tied to no specific point of the compass, but range with their courts from place to place. The demons of the Ars Theurgia are presented as spirits of the air, and they are all thought to possess an airy nature that presents them from being clearly seen with the naked eye. As a result, they are invocated into a scrying glass or a specially prepared crystal known as a “show-stone.” Notably, a crystal show-stone was also employed by Dr. John Dee in his work with the Enochian spirits. Although they are tacitly associated with the element of air due to their subtle natures, many of the spirits of the Ars Theurgia are also associated with other elements. They tend also to be bound to the hours of either the day or the night, and most courts contain demons affiliated with each. The exact date of the material contained within the Ars Theurgia is unknown. Within the Lemegeton, only the book known as the Almadel has an internal date establishing at least when it was copied. This fixes the writing of the version of the Almadel contained within the Sloane collection at the British Museum to 1641. Of the five books traditionally included in the Lemegeton, the Goetia is arguably the oldest, and there are strong connections that can be drawn between the material in the Goetia and that of the Ars Theurgia. Most significantly, both books employ the use of demonic seals or sigils in the invocation of their respective spirits. Notably, all of the major spirits in the Ars Theurgia appear in Johannes Trithemius’s Steganographia. The descriptions of most of these spirits, including their directional affiliations and the numbers of their dukes and sub-dukes, are similar if not identical between these two texts. This places the establishment of this particular system of spirits to at least the end of the 1400s, if not earlier. See also GOETIA, LEMEGETON, TRITHEMIUS.
  • Artenegelun: A demon of disease, credited with the power to inflict fever, tremors, and weakness upon any target. Artenegelun is named in the Liber de Angelis as part of a spell designed to lash out cruelly at an enemy. Serving beneath the infernal king Bilet, when summoned this demon will go forth with his brethren and inflict great suffering and disease upon anyone that the magician targets. The only cure is for the magician to relent and bring an end to the spell. See also BILETH, LIBER DE ANGELIS.
  • Artino: One of twelve chief dukes said to serve the demon Dorochiel. He is connected with the west and with hours of the day. In the Ars Theurgia, he is said to be attended by forty ministering spirits. He will only manifest in the hours between dawn and noon. See also ARS THEURGIA, DOROCHIEL.
  • Asael: In the Book of Enoch, Asael appears as one of the Watcher angels that chose to walk out of Heaven ater swearing a pact with Shemyaza. The Watchers were divided into groups of ten, with each of these groups being led by one of the “chiefs of tens.” Asael is counted among the chiefs of tens. Asael is also named in Conway’s Demonology and Devil-Lore as one of four demons who personify elemental forces. His name may be a variant spelling of Azael. The other demons are Samael, Mccathiel, and Azazel. See also AZAEL, AZAZEL, MACCATHIEL, SAMAEL, SHEMYAZA, WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Ashael: One of several demons said to serve the infernal prince Aseliel during the hours of the day. According to the Ars Theurgia, Asahel holds the rank of chief president, and he has a collection of thirty principal spirits and twenty ministering spirits at his command. Through his affiliation with Aseliel, he is tied to the hierarchy of the east. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASELIEL.
  • Asbibiel: A servant of the demon-king Armadiel, Asbibiel holds the rank of duke. He has a total of eighty-four lesser spirits to minister to him. His name and seal can be found in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to only appear in the thirteenth section of the day, if the day is divided into fifteen equal portions of time. He is affiliated with the north. See also ARMADIEL, ARS THEURGIA.
  • Asbiel: A fallen angel named in the Book of Enoch. Asbiel is said to have given evil counsel to the Watcher Angels. As a result of this counsel, two hundred of the Watchers chose to leave Heaven and succumb to the temptations of the flesh. See also WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Aseliel: An infernal king named in the Ars Theurgia. Aseliel rules in the direction south by east in the greater hierarchy of the east as overseen by the emperor Carnesiel. In his conjurations, Aseliel is also given the title of prince. He has ten chief spirits who serve him during the day and another twenty who serve during the hours of the night. According to the Ars Theurgia, this demon and all of his servants manifest in forms that are very beautiful to behold. They behave in a very loving and courteous manner to those that intereact with them. Aseliel also appears in Trithemius’s Steganographia, where he holds similar ranks and associations. See also ARS THEURGIA, CARNESIEL.
  • Asflas: A servant of the demon-king Albunalich, who rules in the north over the element of earth. Asflas is a hard-working demon who is described as being both even-tempered and patient. According to the Driscoll edition of the Sworn Book, Asflas jealously guards the treasures of the earth, but he will bestow gold and gems upon those who have gained his favor. He has a fondness for certain incenses and perfumes, and he is more likely to manifest if these are burned in his name. He tells the future, imparting knowledge of things to come, and he is also versed in events from the past. He has the power to manipulate the emotions, inspiring anger and rancor even between friends. He is also a greedy guardian of the treasures of the earth, and if someone he does not like goes seeking these treasures, he will wear them down and frustrate their goals. See also ALBUNALICH, ALFLAS, SWORN BOOK.
  • Asimiel: A demon in the service of Camuel, the infernal prince of the southeast. Asimiel’s name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to belong to the hours of the night. Despite his association with the nighttime, Asimiel manifests during the day. He holds the rank of duke and has one hundred lesser spirits to serve him. Asiriel is also named in the Steganographia of Johannes Trithemius. He has the same rank and affiliations in this work. See also ARS THEURGIA, CAMUEL.
  • Asmadiel: An infernal duke in the hierarchy of the demon Macariel. As a demon of rank, Asmadiel commands four hundred minor spirits of his own. According to the Ars Theurgia, he most often appears as a many-headed dragon, although he actually has command over the diversity of forms. Unlike many of the spirits named in the Ars Theurgia, Asmadiel is tied to no particular hour but may manifest at any time, day or night. See also ARS THEURGIA, MACARIEL.
  • Asmaiel: A demon ranked as chief duke in the hierarchy of Armadiel, king of the northeast. According to the Ars Theurgia, Asmaiel commands a total of eighty-four lesser spirits. If the day is divided into fifteen equal portions, Asmaiel’s time falls in the ninth portion. He will refuse to appear during any other time of the day. See also ARMADIEL, ARS THEURGIA.
  • Asmiel: A demon connected with the hours of the day, Asmiel serves the infernal king Symiel. Reputed to possess a good and obedient nature, Asmiel holds the position of duke and rules over sixty lesser spirits. His name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia, where he is identified with the direction north. Asmiel also appears as one of a number of demons listed in Mathers’ translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. Here Asmiel is said to be a servant of the four demonic princes of the cardinal directions: Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon. As such, he can be summoned and controlled in the name of his superiors. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, ARS THEURGIA, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON, SYMIEL.
  • Asmoday: Variant spelling of the demon Asmodeus. In Dr. Rudd’s early-seventeenth-century work, A Treatise on Angel Magic, Asmoday (spelled Asmodai) is curiously described as a demon who “hath one Idea called Muriel incorporated into two figures Geomantic, called Populus by day and Via by night.” Nothing further is offered to help make sense of this enigmatic statement. In addition to this curious declaration, Dr. Rudd’s work describes Asmodai as a spirit connected with the moon. Asmoday is also identified as one of the seventy-two Goetic demons. According to the Goetia, he is a king with seventy-two legions of spirits beneath him. When he manifests, he comes riding a dragon. His form is monstrous, having three heads, a serpent’s tail, and webbed feet. He has the head of a bull, a ram, and a man, and he vomits fire. He tries to deceive people about his true nature, often giving the name Sidonay instead of Asmoday. Those dealing with him are cautioned to press him until he acknowledges his true name. As a Goetic demon, Asmoday can make people invisible and disclose the whereabouts of hidden treasure. Additionally, he teaches arithmetic, astronomy, geometry, and handicrafts. He also has the power to bestow an enchanted item known as the Ring of Virtues. In Wierus’ Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, Asmoday is also mentioned in connection with Solomon’s Brazen Vessel. Here, he is described as the third in rank of the seventy-two infernal kings shut up in that vessel by the biblical Patriarch. According to the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is an infernal king serving under Amaimon, the demonic ruler of the east. In this text, his name is spelled Asmodai, and he is said to be constrained in the name of the angel Vasariah. See also AMAIMON, ASMODEUS, RUDD, SIDONAY, SOLOMON, WIERUS.
  • Asmodeus: Described as the “king of the demons,” Asmodeus appears in the Book of Tobit (sometimes also known as the Book of Tobias.) According to the story, the demon Asmodeus fell in love with the beautiful Sarah, daughter of Raguel. Asmoedus wanted Sarah for himself, and he refused to allow her to be married to any human man. Subsequently, each time that Sarah was married, the demon came to the marriage bed and took the life of her new husband. Seven men fell to the predations of this jealous demon, until Tobias, the eponymous author of the book, received a visit from the angel Raphael, who instructed him on how to handle the demonic paramour. Tobias married Sarah and drove the demon away. Asmodeus reportedly fled to the furthest reaches of Egypt, where he was then bound by the angel Raphael. In the Testament of Solomon, Asmodeus also plays a significant role. Here the demon is called up by King Solomon, who demands to know its names and functions. This version of Asmodeus claims to have been put in charge of the destruction of fidelity, either by separating man and his wife through calamities or by causing husbands to be led astray. He is also said to attack the beauty of virgins, causing them to waste away. In a passage that echoes the Book of Tobit, Asmodeus admits that the angel Raphael holds power over him. He could also be put to flight by burning the gall of a certain fish. Further in the Testament of Solomon, Asmodeus claims to have been “born an angel’s seed by a daughter of man,” a statement that connects him firmly with the tradition of the Watcher Angels. The statement also reflected in the portion of the Jewish Haggadah concerned with the life of Noah. Here, Asmodeus is said to have been born of the fallen angel Shamdon and the lustful maiden Naamah. He was reputedly bound by King Solomon with iron, a metal that was often presented as an anathema to demons. Curiously, in the faerie lore of the British Isles, iron is also a metal that can harm or drive away the fey. The Grimoire of Armadel mentions Asmodeus in conjunction with Leviathan, claiming that these two demons can teach about the malice of other devils. However, that text cautions against summoning these two beings, citing the fact that they lie. Francis Barrett’s The Magus depicts an image of Asmodeus, associating him with the sin of wrath. Asmodeus is mentioned in Arthur Edward Waite’s 1910 Bok of Black Magic and Pacts, where he is listed as the superintendent of Hells casinos. This demonic hierarchy stems from the writings of the ninteenth-century demonologist Charles Berbiguier. Rendered Asmodée in the Mathers translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, this demon is identified as one of eight sub-princes ruling over all other demons. According to this text, Asmodeus has the power to produce food, typically in the form of vast, impressive banquets. He can know the secrets of any person. He also has the power to transmute metals and transmogrify people and animals, changing their shapes at will. He also appears as the thirty-second demon of the Goetia under the name Asmoday. Variations of this demon’s name include Asmoday, Ashmedai, Asmodée, and Asmodai. See also ASMODAY, BERBIGUIER, GOETIA, LEVIATHAN, MATHERS, SOLOMON, WAITE.
  • Asorega: A demon connected with the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. He is a servitor of the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions: Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon. Asorega is named in two of the surviving manuscripts of the Abramelin material: the manuscript kept at the Wolfenbüttal library and the edition published in Cologne by Peter Hammer. In Mathers’ translation, Asorega’s name is given as Astrega. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Asoriel: A mighty duke ruled by the demon Cabariel. Asoriel appears with fifty attending spirits. He is one of a number of demons associated with the points of the compass as defined in the Ars Theurgia. Both Asoriel and his immediate superior serve the hierarchy of the west, underneath the demon-king Amenadiel. See also AMENADIEL, ARS THEURGIA, CABARIEL.
  • Aspar: In the Ars Theurgia, Aspar is named as a chief duke of the night serving the demon-king Malgaras. He has twenty lesser spirits at his command and he will only appear to mortals during the hours of darkness. He is connected with the west. See also ARS THEURGIA, MALGARAS.
  • Asperim: According to Mathers, the name of this demon is derived from the Latin word aspera, meaning “perilous” or “dangerous.” The meaning of the name is perhaps a subtle warning regarding the demon’s true nature. Asperim is one of many demons who serve in the hierarchy of the four demonic princes of the cardinal directions. He is summoned as part of the extensive Holy Guardian Angel rite detailed in the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Asphiel: A chief president said to serve the prince Aseliel during the hours of the night. Asphiel’s name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia. According to this text, he rules over thirty principal spirits and twenty ministering servants. He is part of the hierarchy of the east due to his allegiance to Aseliel. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASELIEL.
  • Asphor: A demon said to hold the rank of chief duke in the court of the infernal prince Dorochiel. He is tied to the hours of the day and will only manifest beneath noon and dusk. According to the Ars Theurgia, he commands no fewer than four hundred lesser spirits. His direction is west. See also ARS THEURGIA, DOROCHIEL.
  • Aspiel: A servant of the infernal king Malgaras. Aspiel appears in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to hold the rank of chief duke. He governs thirty lesser spirits and will only deign to appear during the hours of the night. He is affiliated with the court of the west. Aspiel also appears in this same work in the capacity of a duke serving beneath the demon Asyriel. Here, Aspiel is said to serve during the hours of the night, with ten lesser spirits to minister to his needs. Through Asyriel, this version of Aspiel is allied with the south. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASYRIEL, MALGARAS.
  • Assaba: One of several infernal dukes in service to the demon-king Gediel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Assaba has a total of twenty lesser spirits under his command. He is affiliated with the hours of the day and the direction of the south. See also ARS THEURGIA, GEDIEL.
  • Assaibi: A demon who serves beneath the infernal king Maymon, associated with both the planet Saturn and the direction north. Assaibi appears in Peterson’s translation of the Sworn Book of Honorius. As a Saturnine spirit, Assaibi reputedly can inspire the emotions of sadness, anger, and hatred. Assaibi answers to the angels Bohel, Cafziel, Michrathon and Satquiel. There is a strong likelihood that this demon and the demon Assalbi are one in the same - but for a scribal error somewhere along the way. See also ASSALBI, MAYMON, SWORN BOOK.
  • Assalbi: A minister of the infernal king Albunalich who rules the element of earth from the direction of the north. As a creature of earth, Assalbi holds sway over al the things buried in it, but especially gold and precious stones. He is said to have the power to wear down and utterly frustrate anyone seeking buried treasure. He greedily guards the treasures of the earth but will bestow them upon those in his favor. He is an oracular spirit, imparting knowledge of the future as well as the past. He can incite disagreements between people, causing rancor between friends and bringing them to violence. Compare to Assaibi in the Driscoll edition of the Sworn Book. See also ALBUNALICH, ASSAIBI, SWORN BOOK
  • Assuel: A demon with the title of duke in the court of the infernal king Maseriel. Assuel is affiliated with the hours of the day and, through his service to Maseriel, is also connected with the direction of the south. According to the Ars Theurgia, he has thirty lesser spirits under his command. See also ARS THEURGIA, MASERIEL.
  • Astael: A demon tied to the hours of the day whose name and sigil appear in the Ars Theurgia. Astael appears in connection with the demon Raysiel, an infernal king of the north. Astael himself holds the rank of duke and has fifty lesser spirits at his command. See also ARS THEURGIA, RAYSIEL.
  • Astaroth: One of the seventy-two demons named in the Goetia. His name appears in WIerus’ Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, where he is said to hold the rank of duke with command over forty legions of lesser spirits. When he appears, he takes the shape of an obscene and loathsome angel. He rides an infernal dragon and carries a viper in his right hand. In de Plancy’s 1863 edition of he Dictionnaire Infernal, he is depicted as a naked man with angel’s wings riding a dragon. In Francis Barrett’s The Magus, Astaroth is listed as the prince of the demonic order of accusers and inquisitors. The only major difference between Astaroth’s description in de Plancy’s work and those in The Magus is that the demon rides a wolf or a dog , not a dragon. Astaroth is said to teach the liberal sciences and, like many of the Goetic spirits, he will also discourse on matters of the past, present, and future, as well as the secrets of occult knowledge. In addition to this, Astaroth can confer heavenly knowledge as well: he is said to speak freely about the creator of spirits, the fall of the spirits, and the various sins they committed that inspired their fall. Wierus’s Pseudomonarchia also says that Astaroth has horribly fetid breath. For this reason, the magician is warned to keep his distance from the demon and to hold a magickal ring of silver against his face to protect himself from any injury. Astaroth’s name is given as Elestor in the Lansdowne test known as the True Keys of Solomon. Here, he is said to govern all the spirits in the Americas. In the Goetia of Dr. Rudd, he is said to be constrained with the name of the angel Reiajel. In the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Astaroth is one of eight sub-princes who rule over all other demons. He has the power to discover mines and transmute metals. He can reveal the location of treasure - so long as it is not magickally guarded. He has impressive powers of destruction, causing tempests and demolishing buildings. He can also transform men and animals. This demon has his origins in the BIble, where in the Book of Judges, and in the first Book of Samuel, he is referred to as “the Ashtaroth” and is mentioned in connection with “the Baals,” other foreign gods forbidden to the Israelites. Many later readers took both of these words to be proper names. However, in the time of the ancient Israelites, the Baals and the Ashtaroths were general terms for deities. Baals were the male deities, while the Ashtaroths denoted the female deities. As this would imply, in the process of becoming a demon, Astaroth underwent a gender switch somewhere along the way. The term Astaroth is derived from the name of the Semitic goddess Astarte, a goddess who appears in Ugaritic, Phoenician, and Akkadian sources. She is a cognate of the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. Because she is connected with forbidden things in the Bible, namely with religions that were viewed as fale and heretical by the ancient Israelites, Astarte cum Astaroth was demonized along with a host of other foreign deities. She, now a he, has remained a demon ever since - at least as far as most of Western civilization is concerned. Perhaps because Astarte was such a widely revered goddess in her day, the demon Astaroth is typically depicted as holding significant rank among the hordes of Hell. In a dubious document produced as evidence against the parish priest Urbain Grandier, who was accused of practicing witchcraft and diabolism in seventeenth-century France, Astaroth was one of several well-known demons whose name appears as a signature witnessing Grandier’s pact with Satan. In the Grand Grimoire, Astaroth is listed as the Grand Duke of Hell. In Berbiguier’s infernal hierarchy, Astaroth is one of the Ministers of Hell and is listed as the Grand Treasurer. According to the spurious Grimoire of Pope Honorius, Astaroth is the demon of Wednesday. Variations on this demon’s name include Ashtaroth, Ashteroth, Ashtoreth, Astareth, and Atarot. See also BARRETT, BERBIGUIER, DE PLANCY, GOETIA, GRAND GRIMOIRE, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Astib: A duke of the infernal king Barmiel, Astib is said to serve his master during the hours of the night. This demon is named in the Ars Theurgia. Through his affiliation with Barmiel, Astib is connected with the direction south. Although he holds the rank of duke, this demon has no servants or ministering spirits of his own. See also ARS THEURGIA, BAAL, BARMIEL.
  • Astolit: A demon connected with the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. According to this text, Astolit is ruled by the demon Paimon, one of the four infernal princes of the cardinal directions. See also MATHERS, PAIMON.
  • Astor: A servant of the demon Asyriel. Astor is chief duke with forty servants of his own to carry out his commands. According to the Ars Theurgia, he is tied to the hours of the day and will only manifest during this time. through Asyriel, Astor is connected with the hierarchy of the south. See also ARS THEURGIA, ASYRIEL.
  • Asturel: In his translation of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, Mathers suggests that this demon’s name comes from a Hebrew word meaning “bearing authority.” Asturel is one of many demons who serve beneath Oriens, Paimon, Ariton, and Amaimon, the four demonic princes of the cardinal directions. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Asuriel: A duke of the infernal prince Usiel who serves his master by night. Asuriel has twenty ministering spirits at his command, and according to the Ars Theurgia, he has the power to hide treasure from thieves through the use of charms and enchantments. He can also reveal items hidden through these same means. Through his association with Usiel, he is tied to the court of the west. See also ARS THEURGIA, USIEL.
  • Asyriel: A mighty king named in the Ars Theurgia. Asyriel is the third spirit in rank serving beneath the demon Caspiel, infernal Emperor of the South. Asyriel himself rules from the southwestern point of the compass. He has a total of forty demonic dukes under his command. Twenty of these serve him by day and the other twenty serve during the hours of the night. According to the Ars Theurgia, Asyriel and his demonic court are all good-natured beings, quick to obey those with the knowledge to command them. See also ARS THEURGIA, CASPIEL.
  • Ataf: An evil angel named in the Sword of Moses. The magician is supposed to invoke this being, along with several others, in order to separate a man from his wife. In addition to striking the magician’s enemy so that his family is sundered, these angels are also said to preside over a variety of disorders, including pain, inflammation, and dropsy, a condition associated with heart disease. See also GASTER, SWORD OF MOSES.
  • Athesiel: A demon who is bound to appear only once per day in the eleventh portion of time when the hours and minutes of the day are divided into equal parts. Serving beneath the wandering prince Icosiel, Athesiel holds the rank of duke and has dominion over two thousand two hundred lesser spirits. According to the Ars Theurgia, he and his fellow dukes under Icosiel have a fondness for private homes and are more likely to be found in such locations. See also ARS THEURGIA, ICOSIEL.
  • Atloton: A servitor of the four princes of the cardinal directions: Oriens, Ariton, Amaimon, and Paimon. Atloton is named in the Sacred Mage of Abramelin the Mage. See also AMAIMON, ARITON, MATHERS, ORIENS, PAIMON.
  • Atniel: One of twelve infernal dukes said to serve the demon-king Maseriel during the hours of the day. In the Ars Theurgia, Atniel is said to rule over thirty lesser spirits of his own. He is associated with the hours of the day and with the southern point of the compass. See also ARS THEURGIA, MASERIEL.
  • Atranrbiabil: A demon associated with the element of fire. He serves in the hierarchy of the infernal king Jamaz, who holds sway over the element. As a demon of fire, Atranrbiabil is reportedly hot-headed, qith a quick and energetic nature and a complexion like flame. He has power over death and decay. He can cause death with a word, and raise an army of one thousand soldiers - presumably from the grave. If something has decayed, he can reverse the effects, restoring it to its original state. HE can also prevent decay entirely. Atranrbiabil appears in Daniel Driscoll’s 1977 edition of the Sworn Book, where it is said that he can be enticed to make an appearance if an individual burns the proper perfumes. No clear pronunciation of this demon’s rather complicated name is provided in the text. See also JAMAZ, SWORN BOOK.
  • Atraurbiabilis: A servant of the demon Iammax, infernal king of the planet Mars. Atraurbiabilis appears in the Peterson translation of the Sworn Book of Honorius. According to this text, Atraurbiabilis has the power to sow destruction, murder and warfare. When he manifests, he is small and lean with a color that resembles live coals. This demon is one of five under the rule of Iammaz who are described as being subject to the east wind in addition to their affiliation with the south. The angels Samahel, Satihel, Ylurahihel, and Amabiel hold sway over this demon. Compare to Atranrbiabil, named in the Driscoll translation of the Sworn Book. See also ATRANRBIABIL, IAMMAX, SWORN BOOK.
  • Atrax: In the extra-biblical text known as the Testament of Solomon, Atrax is named as the sixteenth demon of thirty-six spirits associated with the decans of the zodiac. All of these demons are composite horrors, possessing the bodies of men but the heads of animals. They are also demons of affliction and disease. In the case of Atrax, he delights in tormenting humanity with fevers. He can be driven away by invoking the name of the Throne of God. See also SOLOMON.
  • Atriel: One of the demons in service to the infernal king Maseriel. Atriel is named in the Ars Theurgia, where he is given the title of duke. He has command over thirty ministering spirits. He is tied to the hours of the night and serves his master only during this time. As part of the court of the demon Maseriel, Atriel is affiliated with the direction of the south. See also ARS THEURGIA, MASERIEL.
  • Auel: In the Liber de Angelis, this angel is invoked in a spell to achieve control over demons. the spell itself calls for a wax figure and the blood of a black rooster and a white dove. Although it is unclear from the wording of the spell whether or not Auel is a fallen angel, he is invoked along with the demon Baal. If Auel still counts himself among the heavenly hierarchy, one wonders why he keeps such dreadful company. See also BAAL, LIBER DE ANGELIS.
  • Autothith: The thirty-fourth demon associated with the thirty-six decans of the zodiac, Autothith appears in the pseudepigraphal Testament of Solomon. In the text, Autothith proclaims himself a demon of strife. He has the power to cause fighting and grudges between men. He can be driven away by invoking the power of the Alpha and the Omega. See also SOLOMON.
  • Avnas: One of the seventy-two demons of the Goetia. His name is also spelled Amy. Avnas is a great president of Hell with thirty-six legions of lesser spirits at his command. According to Wierus’s Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, he is partly of the Order of Angels and partly of the Order of Powers. He reveals treasures that have bee hidden away under the guardianship of other spirits. He also provides familiars and teaches both astrology and the liberal sciences. When he first manifests, he appears as a burning flame, but he can also put on a human form when commanded. This demon appears also in Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft and the Goetia of Dr. Rudd. In this latter text, his name is rendered Auns, and he said to be constrained by the angel Jejalel. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Axiôphêth: A vicious demon of disease that afflictions victims with consumption [read: tuberculosis] and hemorrhage. He is sometimes also known simply as Phêth, an abbreviated version of his full name. Axiôphêth appears in the extra-biblical Testament of Solomon, and is listed as the twenty-seventh demon associated with the thirty-six decans of the zodiac. All of these demons are said to appear with the heads of beast and the bodies of men, and all of them torment humanity with some manner of ailment. Like his infernal brethren, Axiôphêth can be put to flight by uttering a sacred name. Normally, this is the name of an angel that holds sway over the demon. In a few cases, it is one of the Hebrew names of God. In Axiôphêth’s case, however, the name that has power over him is given as “the eleventh aeon.” Given the antiquity of the text from which he comes, the true meaning and significance of this phrase may have been lost over the years. See also SOLOMON.
  • Axosiel: Commanding one thousand eight hundred and forty legions, Axosiel is one of twelve chief dukes who serve the infernal prince Soleviel. According to the Ars Theurgia, Axosiel is free to appear at any hour, day or night, and he only serves his demonic master every other year. See also ARS THEURGIA, SOLEVIEL.
  • Ayal: A name of the night-demon Lilith, transliterated from the original Hebrew. This name of Lilith appears in connection with Hebrew textual amulets intended for protection. Ayal appears in T. Schrire’s 1966 publication Hebrew Magic Amulets. See also LILITH.
  • Aycolaytoum: In the fifteenth-century magickal text known as the Liber de Angelis, Aycolaytoum is a demon connected with the powers of the planet Jupiter. He serves beneath the infernal king Marastac, and he can be called upon to bend the will of a woman so that she will love the magician unfailingly. The name of this demon may be a corruption or even a play upon the word acolyte. It has its origins in the Greek term akólouthos, which means “follower” or “attendant.” In the context of this spell, “follower” may be intended, as the demon has the power to make a “follower” of the intended victim of the spell. See also LIBER DE ANGELIS, MARASTAC.
  • Aym: A great and powerful due said to rule over a total of twenty-six legions of infernal spirits. He is one of the seventy-two Goetic demons. According to Wierus’ Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, he has three heads: that of a serpent, a man, and a cat. He comes riding a viper, and he carries a flaming brand in one hand. Aym is said to make people witty and to answer truthfully about private matters. With his flaming brand, he is said also to burn cities and towers. He is alternately known as Harborym. In Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft, this secondary name is spelled Harborim. In the Goetia, his name is spelled Aim, and his human face is described as having two stars upon its head. The Goetia of Dr. Rudd says that he can be constrained in the name of the angel Melahel. See also GOETIA, RUDD, SCOT, WIERUS.
  • Ayylalu: In the 1977 Driscoll edition of the Sworn Book of Honorius, Ayylalu is named as one of the ministers of the demon-king Harthan. He is associated with the element water and the direction west. He has a jealous nature and is also witty and agreeable. He has the power to provide strength and resolve and to help others avenge wrongs done to them. In addition, he can move things from place to place and provide darkness when needed. When he manifests, his body is mottled in complexion and amply fleshed. See also HARTHAN, SWORN BOOK.
  • Azael: One of four evil angels said to guard the cardinal directions, Azael is named in the Faustian text Magiae Naturalis et Innatural, published in Passau in 1505. In this text, Azael is associated with the element of water. Henry Cornelius Agrippa was likely referring to this text when he mentioned Azael in connection with the demons of the cardinal directions. He gives Azael as an alternate name used by “the Hebrew Doctors” for Paimon, King of the West. Occultist S. L. MacGregor Mathers repeats this same information in his edition of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also AGRIPPA, MATHERS, PAIMON.
  • Azathi: One of several demons named in the Munich Handbook. Azathi assists the magician in matters of divination. He is called upon in a spell that uses a young and virginal boy as an intermediary for the spirits. See also MUNICH HANDBOOK.
  • Azazel: According to the Book of Enoch, Azazel, together with Shemyaza, was a leader of the Watcher Angels. The text gives parallel versions of the fall of the Watcher Angels. In these side-by-side tales, first Shemyaza and then Azazel is credited with leading the Watchers astray. In Shemyaza’s tale, the main sin committed by the Watchers is one of lust for the daughters of men. For Azazel, the transgression is the dissemination of forbidden knowledge. Azazel can be seen as an angel of warfare, as he taught mankind about the metals of the earth, further showing them how to fashion weapons and armor. IN addition to this, he also taught the secret of cosmetics, encouraging mortal women to paint their eyelids and adorn themselves with costly jewelry. Whether Azazel was the leader of the Watchers, or whether that distinction falls more properly to Shemyaza, can be debated. However, at the very least, Azazel was one of the “chiefs of ten,” making him essentially a lieutenant. In the Book of Enoch, Azazel is punished along with Shemyaza for inspiring the revolt of these angels. They are both bound hand and foot in the desert. Other Jewish sources, such as the Haggadah and the Chronicles of Jerahmeel, also contains versions of the Watcher Angel story. Notably, in the Haggadah, Azazel escapes punishment and remains on earth to cause problems for humanity. This text links Azazel the Watcher Angel directly to the Azazel featured in the Jewish ritual of the Day of Atonement [read: the day before Yom Kippur]. In ancient times, the sins of all of the Israelites would be cleansed once a year by transferring their collective guilt into a sacrificial goat. This practice is recorded in Leviticus 16. Two goats were chosen as sin-offerings in this rite, and lots would be cast for them. One lot was for Yahweh, and the other lot is described as being for Azazel. When the lot for Azazel fell, that goat, from which we derive the term scapegoat, was then taken, and the high priest would confess all of the sins of the people over it. With the sins thus transferred, the goat was then driven off into the desert to meet its fate. ALthough the scapegoat is often recorded as being named Azazel, Azazel is more properly the name of a demon believed to reside in the wastes of the desert. By driving the goat into the desert and associating it with the name Azazel, the ancient Israelites were sacrificing this sin-offering to the demon. In his 1921 publication Immortality and the Unseen World, the Reverend W. O. E. Oesterley argues convincingly that Azazel is an intentionally corrupted rendition of a Hebrew name meaning “strength of God.” Henry Cornelius Agrippa gives Azazel as the Hebrew version of the demon Amaimon, King of the South. This attribution may be derived from Magiae Naturalis et Innatural, a text associated with the Faust tradition and published in Passau in 1505. In this work, Azazel is assigned to the element of air. Mathers repeats Agrippa’s information in his Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. See also AGRIPPA, AMAIMON, SHEMYAZA, WATCHER ANGELS.
  • Azemo: One of several demons said to serve Camuel, the infernal prince of the southeast. Azemo is named in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to belong to the hours of the night. Despite this nocturnal affiliation, Azemo nevertheless manifests during the day. He is a mighty duke of Hell and ten ministering spirits serve beneath him. See also ARS THEURGIA, CAMUEL.
  • Aziabelis: Also named Aziabel in the Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses, this demon is said to appear in the form of a man wearing a large crown of pearls. One of the Seven Great Princes of Spirits, Aziabelis governs the spirits of the waters and of mountains. When summoned, he is often amiably disposed toward the magician, and he can command the spirits under his dominion to yield up their treasures.
  • Aziel: According to the Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses, this spirit is one of seven great infernal princes. He is said to appear in the form of a wild ox. He is an excellent treasure-hunter, revealing valuables that have been secreted away both in earth and sea.
  • Azimel: One of several infernal dukes named in court of the demon-king Maseriel. Azimel’s name and seal appear in the Ars Theurgia, where he is said to rule over thirty lesser spirits of his own. He is affiliated with the hours of the day and the southern point of the compass. See also ARS THEURGIA, MASERIEL.

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— 2 years ago with 19 notes
#demonology  #am-az 
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